Intermittent Fasting is a Lifestyle

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Many people use intermittent fasting as a means to a single end — getting lean. Not a bad goal, or a bad method to achieve it.

But I want to remind all of you that intermittent fasting not only help make us lean but is also a viable eating lifestyle that improves how we manage our daily chores, work commitment, personal projects, social time, and leisure activities.

Intermittent fasting opens up times that we never thought we had. When we’re not obsessing with food, bogged down with food preparation, and eating by the clock, it’s amazing how much more time opens up for us to get things done — or to relish in doing nothing at all, as idle time is progressively lost in our culture, yet remains an important aspect in our health.

Intermittent fasting also appears to offer countless health benefits, such as insulin sensitivity, brain protection, improved blood pressure, reduced inflammation, decreased post-meal oxidation, cellular house-cleaning (microphage), anabolic and catabolic balance, body fat regulation, energy balance, decreased factors of aging, etc.

Fat loss is just a happy by-product of an eating lifestyle that is gaining community momentum — and hopefully cultural momentum, which cannot come too soon, given the obesity and premature health derangement we see today.

Make intermittent fasting a lifestyle, and not just a mean to lose 20, 40, or 60 pounds. We all deserve a lean and good-looking body, but we also deserve maximum health.

Those who have adopted intermittent fasting as a lifestyle can probably testify to not just fat loss but also health improvement. Let’s hear it.

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28 Responses to Intermittent Fasting is a Lifestyle

  1. Mark says:

    I have done IF in the past but it was a more structured program that eventually led me to going back to a “traditional” meal plan because I couldn’t eat the allotted enough calories in the 8 hour window. I just started the Lean Saloon approach yesterday and the lack of focus on calories is really liberating. Today was the first day I left for work and didn’t have to bring a backpack to carry my meals. Just a grocery bag with some meat and fruit in it. It may sound simple but that is so liberating. Lastly, I keep telling myself that it’s OK if I under eat one day because as long as I do some weight lifting and get some protein, my muscle won’t waste but my fat just might! Thanks for creating this blog, the approach is very valuable.

    • Johnny says:

      Hi Mark,

      That’s great to hear you’re giving another go.

      Keep in mind that muscle mass is the result of genetic expression as dictated by mechanical demand (resistance training). Protein turnover will balance out in favor of more muscle if there’s reason for… more muscle.

      A study shows that subjects on a daily intake of only 800 calories for 8 weeks can build muscle mass, so long as the stimulus is there — strength training.

      This is further reason to not stress about not getting enough calories. Your body will supply energy to meet any deficit via stored fat.

      Best,
      Johnny

      • Mark says:

        Perfect, that’s the confirmation that I was looking for. It’s amazing how the fasting period is so easy. I’m rolling through hour 16 and I feel like I could go all day. Thanks Johnny.

      • Johnny says:

        Great, Mark.

        Many people find that, once they understand and are accustomed to the sensation of hunger, they no longer feel the associated “emergency.” Most people (even the lean ones) have plenty of stored fat to meet energy need. I think one of the main contributors to obesity and overweight in the western culture is the disregulation of energy toward storage and away from utilization simply from a constant intake of food — lots of it.

        The propensity to overeat is likely caused by many related and unrelated factors — increased availability of cheap food, the convenience of processed food, aggressive flavoring of food, belief that frequent feeding is ideal, cultural pressure, misinformation, etc.

        Intermittent fasting is the easiest dietary lifestyle that forces the body to metabolize stored fat and return the body to healthy energy regulation. Intermittent fasting along with whole, real food encourage the body to metabolize fat for energy demand, while eating all the time gives the body no reason to metabolize stored fat.

        Best,
        Johnny

  2. Greg Linster says:

    Another gem Johnny! I happen to value the health benefits of an IF lifestyle more than the aesthetics. Looking lean and fit is simply a byproduct of being healthy. By the way, I linked to you in my post today; I hope you don’t mind.

    Cheers,
    Greg

    • Johnny says:

      Hi Greg,

      I am honored to be linked on your blog, as I enjoy visiting and reading your blog regularly. It encourages a lifestyle that saves me money.

      Best,
      Johnny

  3. Mark says:

    Hey Johnny,
    My understanding of this approach in the past couple of days has come a long way. The sheer knowledge that it’s OK to be hungry during the day is powerful. I’m not worried about my metabolism shutting down or my muscle getting eaten away. This really is a liberating feeling. Last night I had a regular dinner and I was content. I didn’t feel the need to eat more food to compensate for the next day’s fast.
    While I just started this approach a couple of days ago, I can tell you that my strength has not diminished so far. Last night at the gym it was deadlift night for me and my clients as we follow a Wendler 5/3/1 schedule (in the Wendler program, you do three sets with the last set done to failure). I did the same weights as June 12 but got 4 more reps on my last set, this after only eating about 3 oz of chicken and 1 sweet potato for the day on top of 4 hours of sleep. In between June 12 and yesterday, I only worked out once. Obviously n=1 here, but it was still exciting. My energy has been very stable throughout the day. I usually have a second coffee around lunch which carries me well until my 1st meal around 4. I did get a little tired about an hour into training my clients last night but figured I just needed to eat as I’m sure my body was using up a lot of blood sugar after the deadlifts. Thanks again Johnny, sometimes the littlest things make the biggest difference. “Turn off the valve”

    • Johnny says:

      Hi Mark,

      Good stuff.

      When the body has “depleted” its glycogen storage, it metabolizes fat into ketone bodies for an energy source that meets the needs of your nervous system and brain. Although I haven’t seen much literature on this, my observation and people’s experience show that this conversion process improves with time and experience. In other words, just people must adapt to a low-carb diet, they also must adapt to intermittent fasting (except IF is an easier lifestyle for many people).

      During the initial stages of IF, you may feel tired, foggy-minded, or generally fatigued, but eventually your body should learn to “switch” fuel sources (glycogen to fat) more efficiently.

      As far as exercise based heavily on the glycolytic system (in which mostly glycogen is the fuel source), muscle and liver should contain sufficient amounts to meet the need for the duration of the session — assuming you’re not doing a marathon weight-training session (which I know you’re not). In fact, during high-intensity, glycogen-based exercise, your body actually creates more blood glucose to meet immediate fuel needs.

      I truly believe you’re on the right path to getting the best from your body while keeping things simple.

      Best,
      Johnny

      • Mark says:

        Thanks for your response Johnny. I agree with you, this just might work. As you were always not lean (205 I think you said once), I know you can appreciate how exciting it would be for me to get lean like you. I will keep updating you on how things are going. Thanks again, much appreciated.

  4. Al says:

    Johnny,

    I have recently experimented with two IF schedules: a feeding window of 11am-6pm (“lunch-to-dinner window”) and a window of 4pm-11pm (“after work window”, just like yours). Now they both appear to be the same schedules being roughly a 7 hour feeding window each. BUT after testing both they are rather quite different to me.

    The first feeding window (11am-6pm) was designed for me to have a lunch a dinner. However I still tended to overreat, mainly with lunch. I finally admitted to myself that I was using to schedule just to give me an excuse to eat lunch (a.k.a. crap food). In result i was still eating at least same amount of food if not more as I did before which was causing weight gain. My lunch hour never seemed long enough to make and eat real food. [And lets be honest, “lunch” is more of a social event than enything else, not becasue we are truly hungry.] I have discovered that lunch just does not work well with IF , a least for me. So I threw this eating schedule out the window.

    Then I experimented with the “after work window” (4pm-11pm). I discovered that my only hurdle was the lunch hour of 11am. My body is used to being fed at 11am, but I noticed that after a few minutes the hunger just went away. I always tended to eat more real food when using this schedule as well. Maybe it is just more time to cook or just feeling the urge to close out the day strong with real food only in my feeding window; i don’t know. Oddly enough while at work from 11am to 4pm I would feel great and hardly ever thought about food, even though my body hasn’t had any food for at least 12 hours.

    All of this ramble has brought me to the conclusion that the “after week window” works best for me. Moral of the story: expereiment with different IF schedules to see which one fits with your lifestyle, not just for fitting it in your schedule better but which one will lead to better habits as well.

    Thanks Johnny for the site as a whole.

    • Johnny says:

      Good to hear it, Al.

      No matter what effectual differences there are between intermittent schedules, finding the one that agrees with you and makes your life easy is always the best one.

      Bottom line, for most people, Intermittent Fasting will offer benefits, no matter the chosen schedule.

      Best,
      Johnny

  5. Al says:

    Johnny,

    Is it safe to say that humans in general are “allergic” to grains and sugar? I can eat a plate of grain and sugar-based foods and my body doesn’t thank me for it with inconsistent bowel movements, stomach aches, and of course fat gain.

    When I eat real, wholesome food my body thanks me for it by encouraging itself to get rid of fat.

    I think that I am personally “allergic” to grains and sugar. My body reacts to this stuff in detrimental ways. I wonder if this “allergic” idea makes any sense to you. Maybe if people looked at grains and sugar this way (as being allergic to them) than maybe they will think twice about consuming it. Thanks!

    • Johnny says:

      Hi Al,

      Great question. I’m not qualified to define food “allergy.” But as a whole, if our body responds negatively to a food, it can be said that there’s an allergic reaction. As such, I would be most comfortable in saying that the body is allergic to food over-consumption. There’s no debate there.

      Whole cultures regularly eat grain-based foods (in various forms) without displaying adverse effects. I think other factors also play into the reaction of grain consumption, such as the degree of refinement, consumption amount, physical activity, sugar intake, nutrient imbalance, etc.

      Hard to pin-point just one food type, but I definitely believe that some people are more sensitive to the intake of grains than others — but I also think that for these people the poison is in the dose, not in the food itself.

      Best,
      Johnny

  6. Jessica Jane says:

    Johnny,

    Great stuff on the site. You look fantastic as well. How long have you been following this 4pm IF pattern? Hard to believe you don’t work out like a mad man for that body!

    You say it’s possible to build and maintain muscle even on a severe calorie deficiency, which may naturally occur with an IF lifestyle, but is that necessarily a good thing on a consistent basis? How many calories do you generally consume every evening?

    Also — best way to break a fast? I’ve heard that easing into it with low-calorie foods is a good idea. I just broke my 19 hour fast (9pm last night to 4pm today) with a spinach, broccoli and zucchini salad topped with about half a cup of ratatouille. Can’t wait for the cilantro & pesto baked salmon at work tonight in another two hours! πŸ˜‰

    Did you ever experience a nauseating feeling when first starting out with IF? At work today I didn’t necessarily feel hungry, but experienced a sort of…woozy, unsettled feeling in my stomach. I had only had a cup of coffee, with a little half and half, which I’ve done mutliple times before on an empty stomach with no problem.

    Thanks πŸ™‚

    • Johnny says:

      Hi Jessica,

      I’ve been IFing for well over a year. I’m not sure how many calories I take in each day, but I imagine I average what my body spends — sometimes more, sometimes less — so that I maintain about 5% body fat with absolutely no challenge!

      The mirror is the best gauge on how much to feed, but don’t let it become obsessive. I typically eat my first meal at 4pm, but if I feel that I’ve eaten a lot the day before (or several days, like during the holidays), or even when my physical activity has reduced dramatically, then I just extend the fast from 4pm to 6pm… or sometimes just throw in a 24-hour fast (but rarely).

      There are a few different responses my body had when I first started IFing, such as occasional nausea, stomach cramps, sharp hunger, fatigue, and lower body temperature. But after a period of adaptation (6 months for me, more or less for others), those sensations no longer exist. I believe that my setting point has moved, and my appetite — which has always been big — has been reduced a lot. I no longer possess the awful desire to gorge, and if I occasionally do, it’s literally uncomfortable and sickening. Years ago, I could eat endlessly at a good buffet. I have much better control now.

      A recent study shows that muscle mass can be gained even under a severe calorie deficit (800 kcal) of many weeks, but an IF lifestyle is not likely to cause a severe calorie deficit for that long — and it shouldn’t. I don’t recommend long-term severe calorie restricting, but intermittently it may help the body use what it has in storage. Remember that weight and fat loss is measured as an average over time. Unhealthy weight gain or extreme calorie deficit are also measured over the same average time span.

      How long have you been IFing and what has been your experience so far?

      Best,
      Johnny

  7. Jessica Jane says:

    Johnny,

    What kind of exercise did you do prior to your current fitness regime? I can’t believe you got your nice physique solely from cutting calories. πŸ˜‰

    A whole six months of nausea, cramps, fatigue, and hunger??! How did you manage to stick with it for so long?

    A little background on myself: I am about 5’4, 110-115lbs, ~17% BF via calibers. I know I don’t need to dip any lower in BF, but I like to experiment with my diet and fitness to find what works the absolute best for me. I’m also quite interested in doing personal training (working on my ACSM certification this summer…) and would like to “practice what I preach.” For exercise, I generally do HIIT/sprint 1-3x a week, bodyweight lifting session 2-3x a week (dips, pull-ups, decline push-ups, etc..I could play around on the monkey bars for hours!), and stay active the rest of the week with consistent biking, walking, and yoga. I started eating paleo last summer and would now never go back (I tried a “refeed” last weekend with many potatoes, oats, bananas, ziti, and even a little icecream…The next day I felt pretty shitty with a stuffed nose and serious fatigue…You don’t ever do refeeds, do you?) I’ve done a few IFs over the past year, I believe my longest was a 23 hour fast, with a couple random ones being 18-22 hours. I started doing Martin Brakhan’s approach for awhile inconsistently, fasting for 16 hours and eating for 8 hours. But… this still allowed for a late breakfast, and a lunch, and then a dinner. Just seemed like too much, and was inconvenient for exercise purposes (with my schedule now, it’s easier for me to workout in the middle of the day.)

    My issue is that I tend to think about food quite a bit when I’m in an IF, but I suppose it’s because I’m just getting used to it. Well, not really food in general, but how I would feel if I had food in me in comparison to how I feel throughout the day WITHOUT any. For now, I’d say I feel better WITH food rather than without.

    Do you injest ANY calories during the day? Lately I have just been having >TBS of unsweetened cocoa powder or a little cream in my coffee, but nothing else.

    I’m also wondering about IF and its role in weight loss. Do you think if the same amount of calories were eaten on an IF schedule such as the one you follow, compared to if somebody had those calories spread along the day, that the one with the fast/feed window would lose more weight? I hear people say IF is “superior” for weight loss, but is this only because of a possible chance of calorie deficit??? Interesting…

    Thanks for your response πŸ™‚
    Jess

    • Johnny says:

      Hi Jess,

      I’ve always trained with some form of resistance, utilizing various methods such as: power lifting, Olympic-style weightlifting, bodybuilding, etc. I’ve always done some form of cardio, too, such as cycling, running, walking, sports, etc. I’ve done CrossFit since 2005.

      But through all that I’ve always carried extra body fat. So although I had muscular development, it was mostly hidden under a layer of fat. In street clothes you would not know that I even worked out.

      As far as adaptation to intermittent fasting… I should have been more clear! The hunger pain, nausea, fatigue and occasional stomach cramps were very transient and existed only during the early phase of adopting intermittent fasting; these probably lasted for only a couple of weeks and occurred only sporadically. They went away quickly. The one experience that lasted for about 6 months was the constant sensation of being cold. That eventually went away, and I no longer feel cold even through this past winter months. I’m not certain of this, but I attribute this diminished sensation of being cold to setting-point adjustment (but not sure).

      These days I don’t train as hard, and I typically do body weight workouts. As such my body responded by eliminating unnecessary muscle mass (which was actually my goal this year). I still have a decent amount of muscle mass, but my body has taken on a ripped, Hollywood physique. There’s no muscle “looseness” as common in athletes who turned sedentary but haven’t adjusted calorie intake. My experience of muscle mass reduction while still staying muscularly “tight” is probably a result of natural protein turnover and recycling (from muscle protein used for other tissues as needed), and matching calorie intake to activity level.

      When I started IFing, I also thought about food often, particularly staring at the clock and judging how much time I have left before I can eat. After a while, I naturally stopped doing this. No food thoughts, no anticipation. I believe this has everything to do with the entrainment of ghrelin release. If you eat 5 times a day, you’ll be hungry 5 times a day from ghrelin release. If you eat twice, you’ll be hungry twice. It takes time for this ghrelin adjustment.

      hang in there.

      Best,
      Johnny

  8. Jessica Jane says:

    Johnny,

    Aha! Crossfit! I have found that crossfitters and gymnasts often have the best-looking bodys.

    Do you think you consumed less calories with IFing, or do you think it is just the “burning of body fat” during your fasting time that dropped your BF digits?

    I’ve heard of people feeling that “cold” sensation with IF. I never was too worried about it. Living in Florida, I can’t see how that’d be a problem for me. πŸ˜‰

    I can feel it getting easier already. Makes things much more convenient, which I love. My only issue is making sure I eat enough in the evening. I feel like if I don’t have at least x amount of calories, then I’ll be really hungry the next day and my energy will suffer because I didn’t properly “fuel” myself. Does that make sense? Do you ever worry about this? I can’t believe you never looked at your caloric intake when trying to lose weight! How long did it take you to see results with IFing?

    Jess

    • Johnny says:

      Hi Jess,

      You ask a great question — whether fat loss comes through lowered calorie intake or increased fat metabolism from the IF. It’s a question I’ve looked into several times before, but could never find a definitive answer.

      I would like to believe that it’s accelerated through both variables. At one point I counted calories, but I don’t really remember how much I was averaging. Due to calorie creeping, I’m sure that average didn’t stay the same over time. I think that the current average amount is still low — but I believe that intermittent fasting makes that lower amount sustainable, mostly due to the fact that the body is now entrained to burn stored fat to meet energy needs while in a calorie deficit state.

      Intermittent fasting stimulates hormones (glucagon, catecholamines, etc.) that increase fat metabolism. Without this increased fat metabolism, a reduced calorie diet may be too difficult to sustain — as symptoms such as consistent hunger, lethargy, and mental fog might be constant.

      I believe that the benefit of intermittent fasting is not so much that it stimulate more fat burning, but that it facilitate fat metabolism to provide energy to meet the needs of the body when it’s under a calorie deficit. It’s might be the most effective way (from a practical and metabolic standpoint) to live with a lower — or, actually, normal — calorie intake.

      This is not to say that the body must be under a constant state of calorie deficit, but only during fasting and for those looking to lose stored fat. (As a completely different topic, it’s only in the western world that we view intermittent fasting as a special diet, when it’s probably a natural and healthy feeding style in many parts of the world.)

      I do understand the concern about properly “fueling” yourself. My advice is not to be concerned. If you’re adequately meeting needs for micronutrients (from whole, fresh food), and if you have some stored body fat to meet fueling needs, then you’ll be perfectly fine. You just have to give the body a chance to learn how to use its stored energy… fatty acids in adipose tissues.

      Hope this helps!

      Best,
      Johnny

  9. Guy says:

    Hello

    I find your website wonderful and informative, and your pictures are totally inspiring.
    I’m finishing a 14 day water fast, and I’m looking into getting into a new pattern of eating, and so far the Warrior Diet/Fast-5 seems the most attractive/practical for my neads.

    I’ve read many post on your site about IF, and I’m curious because although you speak about all that I love, coffee, fruits, vegetables, no meats though as I eat mostly vegan, you don’t mention much about nuts, legumes (beans and chick peas), and rice/cereals. What are your thoughts/ experiences on these?

    Thanks a million
    Guy

    • Johnny says:

      Hi Guy,

      I’m glad you’re visiting, and I hope you hang out on this blog.

      I include one or two handfuls of raw nuts on occasions. I enjoy fruits that are in season. I love coffee and a little bit of heavy cream. Because of their higher content of inflammatory substance (lectins, etc.), I general limit legumes (including cashew, peanuts, and pistachios), although I enjoy some on occasion — the key is in the overall balance of food choices and nutrients. I generally don’t buy and therefore don’t eat rice/cereal; I feel there are far better food choices for taste and nutrients with far fewer calories. If I’m going to take in “empty” calories, I’ll do so with stuff that I truly enjoy, like wine, chocolate, and homemade pastries made with love and bare hands.

      Best,
      Johnny

  10. Jessica Jane says:

    Johnny,

    Sorry for all of the comments/questions I have… Hope you don’t mind, you do a great job at clarifying!

    “As a completely different topic, it’s only in the western world that we view intermittent fasting as a special diet, when it’s probably a natural and healthy feeding style in many parts of the world.”
    You are absolutely right… I haven’t been giving myself designated times to eat with the fast as I’ve done before, as this just tends to complicate things… I just eat when I feel it’s time to eat, and lately that’s been further along in the day, say 3pm or so. My question is if any calories are injested, does this “break” the fast and kill all benefits? For instance… I had a little bit of coconut milk and cream in my coffee this morning, and then I had a little watermelon an hour or two later at work while running around. I can’t believe that this has a great impact on the chemical reactions during fasting though, or does it?… Any studies?

    Thanks,
    Jess

    • Johnny says:

      Hi Jess,

      Ingesting a little fat and/or some fruits will influence the body’s selection of energy sources. In a completely fasted state, the body metabolizes primarily stored calories (fat, etc.), but when you eat a little food, no matter what, you’re giving the body an alternative source of fuel. But it’s not always black and white — if you eat a little during the fast, it simply means some of that energy source comes from your ingested calories, and less from the stored calories. I wouldn’t let this bother you, as any fat burning from the fast can easily be replaced.

      Think of fasting as exercise — both burn stored fat, but it’s easy to replace that fat when you eat a surplus of calories.

      So, a fast does increase fat mobilization, the largest impact for fat loss comes from learning how to eat less. Both are additive, and better than each alone.

      Best,
      Johnny

  11. Mark says:

    Hi Jessica,
    From what I’ve read, you can look at it two ways. If you take in pure fat then your body will still be primarily burning fats for energy as pure fats don’t cause an insulin release. For “pure” fast, Martin Berkhan at LeanGains, says that you’re allowed up to 50 calories in total during your fast or else you are no longer fasting. I think Johnny prescribes more to the insulin management approach of fasting as he has cream (full fat, heavy cream by the way) during his “fast”. I like to have some cream with my coffee in the morning and then I usually eat around 3 or 4.

  12. Johnny says:

    Johnny,

    Nice name by the way. Do you do your workouts fasted or after you have eaten? Does it really matter? I know some IF websites say it’s better to have some food in your system, while others say it’s not so important. In fact, in looking at my son, he won’t eat before he works out and he is in great shape. What’s your take?

    Thanks,

    Johnny

    • Johnny says:

      Hi J,

      I exercise at random times which have no relationship to the fasting schedule. Although there’s evidence that consuming calories (protein, etc.) circa exercise may help increase whole-body protein uptake, there doesn’t seem to be evidence that any of it turns into actual muscle structures like myofibrils and other active and supporting components — in other words, actual muscle mass. Muscle protein (structure) is continuously recycled, regardless of nutrient or food intake (as long as the minimum intake is met at some point). Muscle mass seems to depend on mechanical stimulus (like strength training), and not so much on when you eat.

      However, if your priority is to build a lot of muscle mass, then it doesn’t hurt to time your workout and your food intake. I personally don’t think that makes a significant difference, but if the goal is to build bigger muscle, then it may be worth the effort of exercise-and-meal timing.

      As readers here know, The Lean Saloon is mostly about getting lean and achieving great definition through a much more hassle-free and simpler method. I believe that Leangains.com does an excellent job at maximizing muscle mass while getting lean through fasting, with an emphasis on timing workouts with food intake.

      I personally enjoy a more casual, hassle-free way of getting super lean… but I also believe that appreciable muscle mass can still be achieved without a focus on meal timing.

      The Lean Saloon is all about keeping things simple and liberating your life.

      Best,
      Johnny

  13. david pugh says:

    i have been reading Mark’s daily apple all day and i have suscriped to his email list..i am very impressed and i would love to give IF and Paleo a try..now my qestion to you is..as far as lean mass is concerned or just staying lean with a certain percentage of body fat..can one method do this alone or is it best to combine the two??

    • Johnny says:

      Many people do one or the other successfully. I find that, for getting lean, intermittent fasting is very effective. Eating mostly Paleo may help control appetite and satiate you better than eating a lot of processed, aggressively flavored food. But IF itself removes the ambiguity of eating, so appetite becomes irrelevant to many people. There’s something about making the decision to “turn off the valve” that removes the ambiguity and the “potential” of eating — making the fast doable.

      By the way, this user lost over 15 lbs (7kg.) of body weight in less than a month of IF while still enjoying the hell out of non-paleo food — stuff that most people would really enjoy eating (but feel guilty to). Apparently, no guilt here, and great result.

      Best,
      Johnny

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